S. Evans

I STIM

Light falling on leaves and flowers

Swimming Sun I

 

Light falling on leaves and flowers

Swimming Sun II

 

Sunlight sending rays over mountains and desert

Stretching Sun

 

Artist Notes:

“I Stim” is a play on words — “Eye Stim” and, quite often, “Aye, Stim!” — because I visually stim, most often with natural light. This series has many photographs that I carry with me for stimming purposes when such light is unavailable. 

“Swimming Sun I & II” are my attempts to capture the movement of light as it reflects off water and onto foliage. The leaves are densely layered and as the light swishes over them, I sense it both tactilely and musically . The little dark caverns behind the leaves are magical and mysterious.

When I look at “Stretching Sun”, I can feel the sunlight reaching for and falling over me. I can smell the dry, desert air. I can hear birds chirping, leaves rustling. The sun is warm and gentle on my skin.

It can be hard to describe the sensations of visual stimming. I hope my photographs give viewers some of that pleasurable experience.

 

 

Lynne Hollingsworth

The Cat on the Fence

I’m the cat on the fence
who wonders which way to go?
I’m the cat on the fence.
People are calling from both sides.
I’m the cat on the fence.
I’m just trying to be me.
I’m the cat on the fence
who observes everything…
I’m the cat on the fence
who just wants somewhere to fit.
I’m the cat on the fence
who is stuck on the fence and can’t come down.
I’m the cat on the fence.
I’m just trying to be the person I was meant to be.
I’m the cat on the fence
who wonders who sees me?
I’m the cat on the fence.
Why do people walk past and stare?
I’m the cat on the fence.
Who really cares?
I’m the cat on the fence.
Mum tries to change me and grow me up.
I’m the cat on the fence
who just wants to be seen for who I am!
I’m the cat on the fence
who wore a scuba divers outfit as a mask for twenty-odd years.
I’m the cat on the fence
who has never fitted in the boxes.
I’m the cat on the fence
who tries to please everyone by mimicking others behaviour.
I’m the cat on the fence
why can’t someone understand?
I’m the cat on the fence
and this is how I’ve been for a very long time!
I’m the cat on the fence
and this is where I will always be as I don’t belong anywhere.

— Lynne Hollingsworth

Artist Notes:

I’m near 30, I was diagnosed with other difficulties but my ASD wasn’t picked up until August 13. In this time I’ve had a lot to think about and learn. I work as a midday supervisor for an autistic unit and help run a Rainbows unit [Girl Guides] both of which I love. 


This piece is important to me as I wrote it during a period of burnout after being diagnosed, it explains my analogy of being different and wearing a mask to hide behind. It helps me to understand where I have always been and I expect other readers will understand in some way, especially if they were diagnosed later on in life. 

ONE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Readers,

Welcome to our first issue of NeurodivergART!

We are excited and honored to share the talents of neurodivergent artists with the world.

For too long, other people have used art as a means of speaking about or for us. Why? There are so many neurodivergent artists out there in so many fields! We are creative and hard-working and expressive.

I have been submitting query/cover letters for over two decades. I recently realized that for every one letter I send, my neurotypical colleagues send about twenty. I conferred with them and confirmed that, yes, we are following the same steps:

1). Writing a template letter.
2). Researching the agent/editor.
3). Personalizing the template to the agent/editor.
4). Submitting the letter.
5). Noting in a spreadsheet when to expect a response or (if no response for declined submissions, as is often the case) when to mark the piece as not accepted.
6). Repeat steps 1-5.

Somehow, though, my pace is about twenty times slower than theirs!

I spend hours researching each agent/editor, trying to connect in a handful of words. This feels like small talk and does not come naturally to me at all. I check and recheck my math to compute dates for my submissions spreadsheet. I struggle with the openendness of “no response unless the work is accepted.”

I wondered if my submission rate was related to my neurodivergence.

I conferred with the neurodivergent art community. Sure enough, though the reasons are diverse, we always came back to the same conclusion: The submissions process can be exceptionally daunting for neurodivergent artists. That means, even though there are agents and editors seeking neurodivergent voices, the accessibility is not easy.

Thus, NeurodivergART, was born. Our mission: To create a magazine from and for neurodivergent artists. To offer a submissions process that is straightforward and succinct.

Every month, we will feature one (1) to three (3) artists. The genre and subject matter may vary, but the mission will always remain the same.

Please enjoy, please submit, and please share.

Thank you and with warmest regards,

Saraswati Chand
March 2019

FEATURED ARTISTS

Lynne Hollingsworth

S. Evans