Michiko Ozu

A pilot bear flying a book with several images in a thought-cloud, including letters, animals, and vehicles. Text is "My wish ascends to the sky. Laughter dances along with the wind."

Pilot Junior

Sketch of two hands holding. Text is "Until the end of the world, I'll give you my love."

Holding Hands (Sketch)

 

Orange cat looking out blue window with pink floral curtains. Text is "Even though I don't know what is tomorrow Maybe you will smile at me in a bright new world."

Cat in Window

 

Artist Notes:

Being neurodivergent helps me with creating poetry and art because I feel very deeply, with passion and with all my heart. I think primarily in images and find patterns and connections between things that are unrelated to most people. My brain is like a camera that’s recording everything 360. I can manipulate objects in my brain very easily, turn it around and see it in different angles. It makes reading and language very difficult because words are 2D. Since I have dyslexia and a very a short attention span (ADHD), my poetry is short but I think it captures the whole picture. The negative sides of being neurodivergent are feeling lonely and disconnected from people. I started drawing and writing poetry at age 6 because I didn’t share the same interests as other children and had no friends. I did not really have any training in art school or poetry. I only spend 1 year learning art and poetry in an academic setting. Otherwise, I am self taught.

I’m always longing for a world where we accept and stop discriminating against people whose brains are wired differently. I’m yearning for a society where we are more gentle, empathetic, and sensitive with each other. We cannot deny the existence of anger, anxiety, social injustice, etc but attacking people aggressively through the use of art will not change things. It will only fuels violent behaviors/thinking toward each other. There are better and beautiful ways to get people’s attention on what’s hurting. We need to start using our imagination and stop with the simple ugly expressions such as “f*** you, *f*** this, f*** that, f*** everything” We need to protect children from losing their imagination and we need more adults to start thinking out of the box again. Logic cannot change or improve the world. New and different ideas will.

 

My Twitter: https://twitter.com/daydreaming0318
My Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/WhisperingWingsLLC (enter 3RDFREE to receive your third card for free!)

 

Lynne Hollingsworth

The Cat on the Fence

I’m the cat on the fence
who wonders which way to go?
I’m the cat on the fence.
People are calling from both sides.
I’m the cat on the fence.
I’m just trying to be me.
I’m the cat on the fence
who observes everything…
I’m the cat on the fence
who just wants somewhere to fit.
I’m the cat on the fence
who is stuck on the fence and can’t come down.
I’m the cat on the fence.
I’m just trying to be the person I was meant to be.
I’m the cat on the fence
who wonders who sees me?
I’m the cat on the fence.
Why do people walk past and stare?
I’m the cat on the fence.
Who really cares?
I’m the cat on the fence.
Mum tries to change me and grow me up.
I’m the cat on the fence
who just wants to be seen for who I am!
I’m the cat on the fence
who wore a scuba divers outfit as a mask for twenty-odd years.
I’m the cat on the fence
who has never fitted in the boxes.
I’m the cat on the fence
who tries to please everyone by mimicking others behaviour.
I’m the cat on the fence
why can’t someone understand?
I’m the cat on the fence
and this is how I’ve been for a very long time!
I’m the cat on the fence
and this is where I will always be as I don’t belong anywhere.

— Lynne Hollingsworth

Artist Notes:

I’m near 30, I was diagnosed with other difficulties but my ASD wasn’t picked up until August 13. In this time I’ve had a lot to think about and learn. I work as a midday supervisor for an autistic unit and help run a Rainbows unit [Girl Guides] both of which I love. 


This piece is important to me as I wrote it during a period of burnout after being diagnosed, it explains my analogy of being different and wearing a mask to hide behind. It helps me to understand where I have always been and I expect other readers will understand in some way, especially if they were diagnosed later on in life.